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Calculating shipping based on Weight

You may wish to charge delivery based on the weight of the goods dispatched.  An example may be a chutney maker who charges £10 delivery plus £1 per kilo, and £10 flat rate for 15 to 50 kilos, and free delivery over £50kgs.

Step one: set the Condition to Weight.

Step two: use Min and Max to set the brackets for which each rule would apply.

For example: For 1-15 kilos, there is a delivery charge, 15-50kgs is flat rate of £20, above 50kgs delivery is free. 

You will need three rows, set the first Min and Max to 1 and 15, the second Min and Max to 15.0001 and 50, the third row to Min and Max to 50.0001 and 10000

Important

Ensure the Max for one line is very close to the Min of the next tier of the next charge. Kilos are not whole numbers, you can have 15.5kgs, so you need to set the next charge up to 4 decimal places. i.e. .0001kgs
You always need a maximum number, so set it to a number above any order you have ever taken.

Step three: set the base cost (“Row Cost”) and then incremental cost (“Item Cost”) for each tier of charge.

For example: For 1-15 kilos, there is a delivery charge of £10 plus £1 per extra kilo. 

  • Enter “10” in Row Cost to denote the minimum or base cost
  • Enter “1” in Item Cost, to denote £1 for every extra kilo.

For 15-50 kilos, there is a flat delivery charge of £20. 

  • Enter “20” in Row Cost to denote the minimum or base cost
  • Enter “0” in Item Cost, as there is no incremental cost of additional kilos.

For the free delivery for 15kgs and above enter “0” in both Row Cost and Item Cost.

Step four: Give your delivery charge a Label.  Your Label is displayed to the customers on the product page and at Checkout. 

For example: you deliver by courier, typically next day dispatch for 1-2 day delivery. You might use the Labels

  • “2-3 day delivery (Free delivery over 50kgs)” for chargeable delivery less than 15kgs; 
  • “2-3 day delivery (Free delivery over 50kgs)” for chargeable delivery 15-50kgs; 
  • “2-3 day Free delivery”

The first two have the same Label as they are both chargeable.  The charge itself is quite complicated to explain as the customer wont know the weights of the products they have bought.  You can explain it in more detail in your terms and conditions but there is insufficient space here.

There may be occasions where the Customer might choose between delivery options, for example “Next day” for when you dispatch immediately by courier, and “Thursday Delivery” for when you do van deliveries for that area.  Use your Labels to communicate this to the customer.

Step five: Repeat the above for the other 4 Standard Shipping Zones as required.

Step six: Finish and Update your page to save your work.

Example

Dave decided to move to a new courier company. It’s more cost efficient for him to ship by weight, so he needs to rethink his shipping rates. The new rates provided by the courier are:
0-1000g: £2.70
Above 1kg: £4.30

He needs to create two rows in each shipping zone, one for each rule he wishes to create. To create his shipping rules, Dave does the following:
Row 1:
Condition Weight, Min 0; Max 1; Row cost 2.7; Item Cost 0; Label Next Day Delivery   

Row 2:
Condition Weight, Min 1.0001; Max 10000; Row cost 4.3; Item Cost 0; Label Next Day Delivery   

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Updated on 23rd December 2018

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